Garden Wisdom Blog — pollinators

Planting a Butterfly Garden

butterflies category: Articles and Instructions category: Garden Resources category: Insects Pests and Diseases garden-wisdom how-to-grow pollinators

Planting a Butterfly Garden

The plight of the Monarch butterfly has been a big news item in recent times. Just look up “monarch butterfly” on Youtube, and you’ll find scores of videos aimed at Monarch conservation. The Monarch is unusual due to its remarkable migration route between south central Canada and the hilltops west of Mexico City. For years the governments of Ontario and Quebec, and the midwestern states sought to eradicate various types of milkweed that were thought to be noxious weeds. And then it turned out that these plants are essential food plants for the Monarch. Not only do the adults feed...

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Commit to Grow Day 11: Flower Power

category: Articles and Instructions category: Garden Resources category: Organic Growing Commit-to-Grow flowers how-to pollinators

Commit to Grow Day 11: Flower Power

Grass is used to fill in an awful lot of public spaces. We think of it as the automatic response to revitalizing just about any building or construction site, and since grasses are so darn tough, they seem to thrive just about anywhere. Grass seeds are cheap to produce, and the plants are durable, so it stands to reason that we have come to depend on it this way. But it isn’t much more than that. We like the idea of supplementing unused grassy spaces with wildflowers, but there are some basic principles to understand for the best success. First...

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Commit to Grow Day 7: Xeriscaping

category: Articles and Instructions category: Garden Resources category: Organic Growing Commit-to-Grow flowers pollinators seeds

Commit to Grow Day 7: Xeriscaping

It’s pronounced “zee-re-scape-ing.” And it’s a key concept for landscapers as we look to a future of water conservation and climate change. It’s worth mentioning again in this series of Twenty-one Days of Green leading up to Earth Day, because the Earth can’t take much more of water-hogging garden designs. Simply put, xeriscaping is a system of landscaping with water conservation as the priority. In areas that receive little rainfall in the summer, some thoughtful xeriscaping will allow flowering plants to thrive, adding visual appeal – as well as important forage for pollinators. There are five principles that are key...

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Commit to Grow Day 4: Transforming Lawns

category: Articles and Instructions category: Garden Resources category: Organic Growing Commit-to-Grow garden-wisdom how-to-grow pollinators

Commit to Grow Day 4: Transforming Lawns

While recreational field turf has its uses, most urban and suburban lawn leaves the Earth with a net loss. Space that could be used for growing food or feeding pollinators is dedicated instead to demanding, non-native grasses. Lawn grass is challenged by animals that prey on European chafer (and other) beetle larvae in the winter and spring, and then it dries out and turns brown in the summer due to watering restrictions. We think it’s time to consider transforming lawns to more sustainable uses. We’re asking you to Commit to Grow something more useful than grass. Xeriscaping Xeriscaping is a...

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Commit to Grow Day 3: PARGAR

category: Articles and Instructions category: Garden Resources category: Organic Growing Commit-to-Grow how-to-grow pollinators seeds

Commit to Grow Day 3: PARGAR

We continue our Twenty-One Days of Green with a look at an amazing community group. One of our favourite of all gardening organizations is Plant a Row Grow a Row. Quite simply, they encourage gardeners to plant one extra row of food to donate to their local food bank. This gives families crucial access to fresh, locally grown produce in an environment that normally leans heavily on donations of processed foods in boxes and cans. Across Canada, Plant a Row Grow a Row is connecting growers with food banks and soup kitchens. They also provide step-by-step instructions on how to...

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